Resources from Recharge Day; D2L Conference here at Normandale; and more!

Happy Monday everyone!

Last week, there were an amazing number of faculty development opportunities, and we hope you had the chance to take advantage of some of them. In case you missed a session that you wanted to attend, we have compiled some of the resources from those sessions on the CTL D2L page. There, you can look in the Content module “Material From Development Days” and find the “Recharge Day 2019 and Sara Goldrick-Rab Presentation” module. Here, we have resources from the following presentations and breakout sessions:

  • Sara Goldrick-Rab’s presentation about college affordability on Friday, March 29
  • Handout on student resources from the student panel on Recharge Day
  • Videos for All
  • Information from the Textbook Depot
  • Judy Richardson-Mahre’s session on ADHD
  • Jack Norton’s session on SPLOT and MYOS (managing and simplifying the technology you use)
  • What’s that FN grade?

Also, in Sara Goldrick-Rab’s presentation, she mentioned that sharing information on our syllabi about campus resources can be a great way to show students that we think of them as humans first, and then students. The Center for Teaching and Learning has made this easy for you! We have compiled a list of resources around campus, resources from gender-inclusive bathrooms to printing services to information about getting your car jump-started to mental health services, and many more. Each semester, we check and make sure that the phone numbers, locations, and names are current. This Course Syllabus Campus Resource can be found on the CTL D2L page under Content–>Syllabus Resources. Please feel free to distribute this sheet directly to your students as part of your syllabus!

Also, there are a few exciting upcoming faculty development opportunities here at Normandale.

  • First off, if you are interested in learning more about the CTL restructuring for next year, we are holding a forum on Wednesday, April 3 from 2:30-3:30 in A2552. Come with your questions–we hope to see you there!
  • This Friday, April 5th, is the D2L Connection: MN Edition User Conference. This conference will feature sessions on best practices for using technology in the classroom (both in person and online), on subjects including captioning and video creation, rubrics, animation, and more. Kathleen Coate still has two prepaid spots for faculty who are interested in attending–contact her at kathleen.coate@normandale.edu for more information.
  • As part of this D2L Connection conference, Dave Maurer, our new D2L Account Manager, and Dan Semi, Systems Engineer and Trainer, will be hosting a listening session about D2L from 12:30-1:20 p.m on Friday, April 5 in P0808. This is our chance to voice our pleasure or displeasure, concerns, or wishes about the learning management software we use everyday. Come and make your voice heard!
  • On Monday, April 15, we will be offering a workshop on Turnitin in A2552 from 3-4 PM. Turnitin is a tool integrated within D2L, and is most commonly used as an “originality” check for student written work. Other functions include spelling and grammar tools, and robust markup and feedback tools. Instructors can choose whether student papers will be loaded into the “student repository,” or just run through an initial check against other online papers and web resources. Come learn the way in which your colleagues are benefiting from using this tool, and some of the teaching & learning principles behind it. Bring your laptop so that you try out new techniques as you learn them!

Out from the shadows of MinneapolisFinally, some of our colleagues from Minneapolis College, Dr. Jay Williams and Alison Bergbloom Johnson, have edited a collection of stories by students at Minneapolis College. This book is called Out from the Shadows of Minneapolis: Power, Pride, and Perseverance at a Northern Community College, and it is available for free through Opendora.

Have a great week, everyone!

 

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A New Faculty Focus Interview, Upcoming CTL Workshops, and more!

Happy Monday everyone! We’d like to start off today with a new Faculty Focus interview, this time with Steve Everett, faculty in accounting. We hope you enjoy this chance to get to know a bit more about how Steve, including how he got into accounting and what creative activities he uses in the classroom.

Also, if you have recommendations for colleagues that you think should be featured, please email Jen Miller (jennifer.miller@normandale.edu) with your suggestions.

We’d also like to remind everyone that tomorrow (3/26) is Recharge Normandale day, and we hope to see you all there! We have a wide variety of breakout sessions, on topics including helping students in crisis, tools and techniques for working with students with ADHD, simple technologies that can make your life easier, video creation, and more. We are particularly excited about the panel of students at the end of the day who will be sharing how financial challenges affect their success in college.

This student panel builds up nicely to our exciting guest speaker this Friday, March 29: Sara Goldrick-Rab will be speaking about the cost of college and its impacts on students from 12-1:15 pm in the Lorenz Auditorium. Her presentation will be followed by two breakout sessions that look at various perspectives on making college more accessible and affordable. Dr. Goldrick-Rab’s work is nationally recognized, and it is fantastic to have her here on campus!

As we look ahead to the last weeks of the semester, we have scheduled two more CTL workshops, both focused on academic integrity:

  • First, on Monday, April 15th, we will be offering a workshop on Turntin in A2552 from 3-4 PM.Turnitin is a tool integrated within D2L, and is most commonly used as an “originality” check for student written work. Other functions include spelling and grammar tools, and robust markup and feedback tools. Instructors can choose whether student papers will be loaded into the “student repository,” or just run through an initial check against other online papers and web resources. Come learn the way in which your colleagues are benefiting from using this tool, and some of the teaching & learning principles behind it. Bring your laptop so that you try out new techniques as you learn them!
  • Then, on Monday, April 29th, also in A2552 from 3-4 PM, we will be holding a workshop for faculty to discuss academic integrity more broadly, particularly how it is impacted by technology. If you are interested in hearing from your colleagues about strategies they use to stop cheating, or thinking through ways of using technology to maintain academic integrity, or discussing possible responses to student plagiarism or cheating, then this workshop is for you! Stay tuned for more details.

Next, in technology-related news…

  • First, Kathleen Coate will not be available for D2L drop-in hours either Thursday afternoon or Friday of this week.
  • Registration for the Open Textbook Network closes today!
  • Also, next year, Minnesota State will be offering five short courses that will support effective online teaching. They are currently looking for faculty to collaborate in the development of these courses, which will cover the following topics:
    • Course Design Unleashed
    • Humanizing Your Course
    • Learning, Assessment, and Feedback
    • Equity and Culturally Responsive Teaching
    • Creating Accessible Course Materials

If you are interested in hearing more information about this project or the specifics of these potential classes, please email Jen Miller (jennifer.miller@normandale.edu) or Kathleen Coate (kathleen.coate@normandale.edu). Faculty interested in collaborating on the development of one of these courses should fill out this form.

And finally, here is a little light reading to send you on your way this week. Linda Hodges, in her article “Designing the Denouement in Active and Flipped Classrooms,” offers strategies for making sure that students are coming away from in-class learning activities having achieved what we want them to. This article, published in The National Teaching and Learning Forum, Volume 28, No. 1 (December 2018), is available here through the Normandale Library subscription.

Have a great week, everyone! Enjoy the sunshine 🙂

 

Changes to the Center for Teaching and Learning; plus, a few reminders

Hi all!

We at the Center for Teaching and Learning hope you all had a great spring break! We are excited today to share with you some changes that we will be making to the structure of CTL to better serve the needs of faculty, but first, a few events that we want to make sure you don’t miss:

  • Today, from 3-4 pm in A2552, John Parker-Der Boghossian will lead the CTL workshop “Inclusive Classrooms: The Minority Stress Model Perspective.” In this workshop, John will discuss the Minority Stress Model, which comes from health research seeking to understand health disparities affecting marginalized communities. Applied to higher education, the Minority Stress Model provides unique insights into how our students navigate institutions and strategies we can use to promote inclusive classrooms. We hope to see you all there!
  • Before break, you received an email about the REFLECT program hosted by Anoka-Ramsey Community College. This is a fantastic opportunity to come together with other scholars of teaching and learning from around the Minnesota State system. More information is available here; applications are due to Kristina Keller by this Friday, March 22.
  • This summer, St. Cloud Technical and Community College is hosting the Institute for Culturally Responsive Pedagogy, “a dynamic cohort of colleagues committed to increasing cultural competence and the use of culturally responsive and inclusive teaching strategies.” Specific dates, more information about funding, and the application form can all be found here (you will need to log in with your Star ID@minnstate.edu and password). Applications are due April 8.

And now, for the exciting news about the changes coming to CTL next year!

Every week here at Normandale, faculty engage in amazing assessment and faculty development work, simply because that is what it means to do our jobs.

  • Has your department scheduled a workshop to train faculty in a new teaching strategy?
  • Has someone come to one of your department meetings to share information about a particular student service on campus?
  • Has your department worked through a program review or curriculum mapping project?
  • Have you met with other faculty in your department to share assignment ideas or lesson plans?
  • Have you gotten one-on-one help with D2L?

These things, and many, many more, are all examples of the faculty development and assessment work that you are already doing.

The Center for Teaching and Learning wants to make it easier for you to do this work.

That is why, starting in Fall 2019, the structure of the Center for Teaching and Learning is going to look a little different. Rather than schedule workshops that try (and fail) to address the needs of the whole campus, or force assessment projects to fit into a certain format, we will reallocate the CTL budget to help support the development and assessment work that you already know needs to happen.

Here is what this might look like:

  • Maybe your department wants to bring in a speaker on an exciting topic related to your discipline.
  • Maybe your department wants to hold a half-day retreat to talk about pedagogy or assessment, and wants help setting that up.
  • Maybe your department needs to conduct your program review and wants guidance aligning course outcomes with program outcomes.

There are many more possibilities as well—these are just a few examples!

CTL will provide support for projects like these in three key ways:

First, your department can get support for projects like these through available CTL funds; a process will be put in place to make getting this financial support simple.

Support will also be available through the three CTL Campus Leaders:

  • CTL Leader: Faculty Development Coordinator—This person will help schedule and organize faculty development efforts across campus, maintaining a campus-wide calendar of events.
  • CTL Leader: Assessment Coordinator—This person will help departments coordinate their assessment work.
  • CTL Leader: D2L/Online Learning Trainer—This person will help both departments and individuals with D2L and online learning needs.

Finally, support in the form of time will be available during the CTL College Hours—the 3rd and 5th Mondays of the month. This time will continue to be used for faculty development and assessment work, but on a department level, rather than campus-wide. Departments can use this time to host speakers, conduct trainings, work on assessment projects, or whatever they have identified as their particular faculty development or assessment needs.

CTL will also continue to support individuals who go above and beyond in their contributions to faculty development and assessment.

Several times a year, the Center for Teaching and Learning plans to hold high-impact events that will enable faculty to dive deeper into a particular faculty development or assessment-related topic. Some of the CTL budget will be used to provide funding for faculty to participate in these events, so that those who have a particular passion for faculty development or assessment can continue to cultivate their expertise.

We will be holding a series of forums to discuss this restructuring in greater detail and answer any questions you might have. These forums will be held on the following dates:

  • Monday, March 18 from 12-1 pm in A2552
  • Tuesday, March 19 from 3-4 pm in A2562
  • Wednesday, April 3 from 2:30-3:30 in A2552

If you have questions and can’t make it to one of the forums, please reach out to one of the current members of the CTL team: Jen Miller, Kathleen Coate, and Betsy Longley.

Have a great week, everyone!

And It’s Already Week 7!

While you wouldn’t guess it by looking out the window at the mountains of snow, this is the last week before spring break! Today, we have some interesting articles for you to read, along with some reminders about faculty development opportunities after spring break.

Some things to read:

  • Wondering how to foster more productive conversations about challenging topics? This article by Loretta Ross introduces the concept of “calling in”–that is, pointing out underlying differences in understanding things such as race or privilege in a way that is intended to de-escalate conflict, rather than shame the speaker. She provides suggestions for language that we can use in the classroom to model this practice, leading to more genuine understandings of each other.
  • Many state college systems around the country are getting rid of their developmental education courses (courses designed to get students up to college level in areas such as math, reading, and writing) under pressure to reduce student debt. What are the effects of such a program shift? How do we see this debate playing out here at Normandale? What impact might it have on your classes?

Upcoming events:

  • On Monday, March 18, John Parker-Der Boghossian will lead the CTL workshop “Inclusive Classrooms: The Minority Stress Model Perspective.” In this workshop, John will discuss the Minority Stress Model, which comes from health research seeking to understand health disparities affecting marginalized communities. Applied to higher education, the Minority Stress Model provides unique insights into how our students navigate institutions and strategies we can use to promote inclusive classrooms. We hope to see you all there!
  • Interested in learning more about Open Education Resources (OERs)? LeadMN and Minnesota State are hosting an Open Education Resource symposium on Thursday, March 21 from 11 AM-1 PM. The symposium will be held at Lead MN and will also be webcast. This symposium will feature three faculty presenters, who will discuss the following topics:
    • Mark Gucinski (St. Cloud Technical and Community College) – OERs in Biology: One Faculty Members Perspective
    • Dan Allosso (Bemidji State University) – Remixing and Authoring OER
    • Kenny Tapp (Riverland) – Building and Using OER in Online Astronomy Courses
  • The Annotations tool for Assignments in D2L is expected to be released on March 21st as well! For more information about what this tool does, check out this preview.
  • The Center for Teaching and Learning is covering 10 faculty registrations for D2L Connection: Minnesota Edition, the D2L conference being held here at Normandale on Friday, April 5th. This conference is a great way to get more experience using various features of D2L Brightspace, as well as to share feedback with D2L staff and share strategies with colleagues from across the system. If you are interested, please contact Kathleen Coate–but act fast, since there are only a few of these free spots left!

Have a great week, everyone! We’ll see you all again after break 🙂

 

An Introduction to Opendora, D2L Connection Registration, and Rethinking Assignment Deadlines

Happy Monday, everyone!

This afternoon, from 3-4, Minnesota State will be holding a virtual conversation about Opendora, a digital archive for open educational resources.  This archive will enable faculty and librarians to easily load and share open educational resources (OER), which can help reduce the cost of textbooks! Karen Pikula, the OER Faculty Development Coordinator at Minnesota State, will be hosting this conversation, which will focus on questions users have, information about how to create an account, and how Opendora is structured.

You can join the conversation about Opendora here from 3-4 pm today (Monday); if that time doesn’t work for you, here is the user guide for this resource.

The Center for Teaching and Learning is covering 10 faculty registrations for D2L Connection: Minnesota Edition, the D2L conference being held here at Normandale on Friday, April 5th. This conference is a great way to get more experience using various features of D2L Brightspace, as well as to share feedback with D2L staff and share strategies with colleagues from across the system. If you are interested, please contact Kathleen Coate–but act fast, since there are only 5 of these free spots left!

With so much snow and ice on the roads, many students are struggling to make it to class, and often, to turn work in on time. This means that we as faculty might have to revisit policies for late work or come up with flexible options for students turning things in on time. Here in an article from The Chronicle of Higher Education about a professor who decided to do away with deadlines altogether that might be interesting to consider.

Also, remember the following upcoming dates:

  • Monday, March 18: CTL hour with John Parker-Der Boghossian, Normandale’s Equity and Inclusion Officer. John will be talking about minority stress theory and ways to make a classroom feel more inclusive.
  • Tuesday, March 26: Recharge Normandale Day! This full-day development day for all faculty and staff will feature a morning keynote speaker, followed by afternoon breakout sessions on a wide variety of topics. Stay tuned for more details!
  • Friday, March 29: Visit from Sara Goldrick-Rab, author of Paying the Price, a book about the effect of debt and financial hardship on students. More information to come!

Have a great week!